What caused the drought of the 1930’s?



Due to low crop prices and high machinery costs, more submarginal lands were put into production. Farmers also started to abandon soil conservation practices. These events laid the groundwork for the severe soil erosion that would cause the Dust Bowl.

What caused drought in 1930s?

The study found cooler than normal tropical Pacific Ocean surface temperatures combined with warmer tropical Atlantic Ocean temperatures to create conditions in the atmosphere that turned America’s breadbasket into a dust bowl from 1931 to 1939.

What was a major cause of the 1930s Dust Bowl?

Crops began to fail with the onset of drought in 1931, exposing the bare, over-plowed farmland. Without deep-rooted prairie grasses to hold the soil in place, it began to blow away. Eroding soil led to massive dust storms and economic devastation—especially in the Southern Plains.

What stopped the Dust Bowl?





Rain falls, but the damage is done



Although it seemed like the drought would never end to many, it finally did. In the fall of 1939, rain finally returned in significant amounts to many areas of the Great Plains, signaling the end of the Dust Bowl.

How long did the drought of the 1930s last?

The 1930s was an exceptional time to be in the High Plains. The entire region, already a semi-arid climate to begin with, endured extreme drought for almost a decade. Over the 11-year span from 1930-1940, a large part of the region saw 15% to 25% less precipitation than normal.

How long did it not rain during the Dust Bowl?

The drought came in three waves: 1934, 1936, and 1939–1940, but some regions of the High Plains experienced drought conditions for as many as eight years.

How did people survive the Dust Bowl?

In 1932, the weather bureau reported 14 dust storms. The next year, the number climbed to 38. People tried to protect themselves by hanging wet sheets in front of doorways and windows to filter the dirt. They stuffed window frames with gummed tape and rags.

Could the Dust Bowl have been prevented?





Unfortunately, the Dust Bowl could have been avoided if the settlers had recalled the dry history of the area, had used different farming methods, and had not overplowed and overgrazed the land.

Can the Dust Bowl happen again?

Improved agricultural practices and widespread irrigation may stave off another agricultural calamity in the Great Plains. But scientists are now warning that two inescapable realities — rising temperatures and worsening drought — could still spawn a modern-day Dust Bowl.

Did the Dust Bowl land ever recover?

While some of the Dust Bowl land never recovered, the settled communities becoming ghost towns, many of the once-affected areas have become major food producers.

Who planted trees during the Dust Bowl?

During the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, the federal government planted 220 million trees to stop the blowing soil that devastated the Great Plains.

Which states were most affected by the Dust Bowl?

Although it technically refers to the western third of Kansas, southeastern Colorado, the Oklahoma Panhandle, the northern two-thirds of the Texas Panhandle, and northeastern New Mexico, the Dust Bowl has come to symbolize the hardships of the entire nation during the 1930s.



Was the Dust Bowl a man made disaster?

The Dust Bowl was both a manmade and natural disaster.



Once the oceans of wheat, which replaced the sea of prairie grass that anchored the topsoil into place, dried up, the land was defenseless against the winds that buffeted the Plains.

What were the temperatures during the Dust Bowl?

The “Dust Bowl” years of 1930-36 brought some of the hottest summers on record to the United States, especially across the Plains, Upper Midwest and Great Lake States.



Heatwave of July 1936.

Location Temperature Date
Mondovi, WI 110°F July 14
Richland Center, WI 110°F July 14
Rochester, MN 108°F July 11 & 14
La Crosse, WI 108°F July 14

What happened to the people who actually lived through and experienced the Dust Bowl?

What happened to the people who actually lived through and experienced the Dust Bowl? They lost all of their means to make a living; had to leave because their crops were destroyed and they could not farm. Describe the Southern Plains.

What happened to the Okies?

Supposedly, the Dust Bowl forced “Okies” off their land, but far more migrants left southeastern Oklahoma than the Dust Bowl region of northwestern Oklahoma and the Panhandle.

What are 3 main causes of the Dust Bowl?

Economic depression coupled with extended drought, unusually high temperatures, poor agricultural practices and the resulting wind erosion all contributed to making the Dust Bowl.



What were the man made causes of the Dust Bowl?

Human Causes People also had a hand in creating the Dust Bowl. Farmers and ranchers destroyed the grasses that held the soil in place. Farmers plowed up more and more land, while ranchers overstocked the land with cattle. As the grasses disappeared, the land became more vulnerable to wind erosion.

Could the Dust Bowl have been prevented?

Unfortunately, the Dust Bowl could have been avoided if the settlers had recalled the dry history of the area, had used different farming methods, and had not overplowed and overgrazed the land.

Did global warming cause the Dust Bowl?

The epochal drought of the 1930s that led to the Dust Bowl was not a megadrought, nor was it the result of climate change. But the damage it caused was fueled by economic motives and free-market ideologies paralleling those shaping present-day climate policy.

What is the hottest year on record?

The latest numbers follow the planet’s long-term warming trend. The average temperature in 2020 tied with that from 2016 to be the hottest year on record, according to NASA.

What was the temperature during the Dust Bowl?

The “Dust Bowl” years of 1930-36 brought some of the hottest summers on record to the United States, especially across the Plains, Upper Midwest and Great Lake States.



Heatwave of July 1936.



Location Temperature Date
Rochester, MN 108°F July 11 & 14
La Crosse, WI 108°F July 14
Lancaster, WI 108°F July 14
Viroqua, WI 108°F July 13