Should I use high mileage oil?



Who needs high mileage oil? Cars with more than 75,000 on their odometer can usually benefit from high mileage oil. Older vehicles with fewer miles can benefit too, as engine seals can erode over time regardless of mileage. Degraded seals mean leaking oil, and leaking oil means your engine isn’t working at its best.

Can high mileage oil damage an engine?

High-mileage motor oil doesn’t hurt and it could prevent leaks from starting. Most vehicle manufacturers would say it’s normal for an engine to consume some oil between oil changes.

Is high mileage oil recommended?

In order to prevent oil leaks and burning oil (which often happens in older engines), we recommend using high mileage oil that makes your engine’s o-rings, gaskets and seals swell.

When should you start using high mileage motor oil?





It all depends on how the vehicle has been driven and maintained. Some people might consider switching to a high mileage oil at 200,000 miles, while others may want to change to a high mileage oil at 80,000 miles. For the average driver, anything over 100,000 miles could safely be considered a high mileage vehicle.

Can I switch from high mileage oil to regular oil?

Synthetic Motor Oil Myths



However, synthetic oil would not cause the leak. You can’t switch back to conventional oil: Once you switch to synthetic, you are not bound to it forever. You can switch back to conventional oil if you choose to do so and your vehicle manufacturer doesn’t recommend otherwise.

Should I use high mileage oil if I have no leaks?

The bottom line is that high-mileage engine oils are designed for engines that are beyond their warranties and have 60-, 80-, 150,000 miles. Use it if you see a leak or notice rattling.

Does high mileage oil swells seals?

High mileage oils contain seal conditioners, which cause gaskets and seals on mating surfaces to swell.

Is high mileage synthetic oil good?





High mileage oil is designed for vehicles with more than 75,000 miles. Such oil features additives that help protect seals. This leads to less leakage and oil burn-off, which can be common in older cars. If your vehicle is high-mileage and high performance, it’s suggested that you go with this type of synthetic oil.

What is the difference between high mileage oil and full synthetic oil?

Full synthetic oils offer better performance than high-mileage oils because they’re low density and flow better. In contrast, high-mileage oils have higher viscosity which means your engine will have to work extra hard to push the oil, leading to reduced performance.

Is high mileage oil and synthetic oil the same?

High mileage oils are usually synthetic oils. They are typically based on either full-synthetic oil or a blend of synthetic and conventional oil.

Is it better to use thicker oil in high-mileage engine?

A: Yes. This is a practical method to improve oil pressure in an older, high-mileage engine. The slightly thicker oil film from the heavier base weight oil — 10W — can help protect worn engine bearings as well.

How long does high-mileage synthetic oil last?

10,000 to 15,000 miles



Davis says that educated drivers should opt for longer lasting, better performing synthetic oils, which are “most likely good for 10,000 to 15,000 miles or six months” whether or not their manufacturers recommend more frequent changes or not.

How often should you get a high-mileage oil change?

It used to be normal to change the oil every 3,000 miles, but with modern lubricants most engines today have recommended oil change intervals of 5,000 to 7,500 miles. Moreover, if your car’s engine requires full-synthetic motor oil, it might go as far as 15,000 miles between services!

Why can’t you go back to regular oil after synthetic?

Myth: Once you switch to synthetic oil, you can never switch back. This is one of the most persistent myths about synthetic oil—and completely untrue. You can switch back and forth at any time. In fact, synthetic blends are simply a mixture of synthetic and conventional oils.

Can you switch to synthetic oil with high mileage?

As long as your engine’s seals are in decent shape, you can switch back and forth to your heart’s content. You can mix and match, you can use blended synthetic and mineral oil or you can use mineral oil for 3,000 miles (4,828 kilometers) and synthetic oil for the next 5,000 miles (8,047 kilometers).

What is considered high mileage for a car?

DO NOT USE High Mileage Oil?



Can you mix high mileage synthetic oil with regular synthetic oil?

High-mileage motor oil.



Mixing them will not improve the performance or efficiency of your engine in any way. Nor will mixing improve the oil performance, either. This is illustrated by these two equally important points: Adding synthetic oil to regular motor oil will not enhance the regular oil.

Is it better to use thicker oil in high mileage engine?

A: Yes. This is a practical method to improve oil pressure in an older, high-mileage engine. The slightly thicker oil film from the heavier base weight oil — 10W — can help protect worn engine bearings as well.

What is the difference between high mileage oil and full synthetic oil?

Full synthetic oils offer better performance than high-mileage oils because they’re low density and flow better. In contrast, high-mileage oils have higher viscosity which means your engine will have to work extra hard to push the oil, leading to reduced performance.

How often should high mileage oil be changed?

You may be wondering “how often should I change my oil if my car has high mileage”? If you have a newer car with 150,,000 miles you likely should also change your oil every 3,000 miles. If you burn more than 1 quart of oil or your oil is very dark before you get to 3,000 miles it’s likely time to change it!

Should I go by oil life or mileage?

Today, it’s common for an OLM in a vehicle driven mostly under normal service to recommend an oil change after 10,000 miles (16,000 km) or more. They’ve prevented the waste of countless quarts of perfectly good oil over the years.



How long does high mileage synthetic oil last?

10,000 to 15,000 miles

Davis says that educated drivers should opt for longer lasting, better performing synthetic oils, which are “most likely good for 10,000 to 15,000 miles or six months” whether or not their manufacturers recommend more frequent changes or not.