How was Upper Canada different from Lower Canada?



Lower Canada covered the southeastern portion of the present-day province of Quebec, Canada, and (until 1809) the Labrador region of Newfoundland and Labrador. Upper Canada covered what is now the southern portion of the province of Ontario and the lands bordering Georgian Bay and Lake Superior.

What happened in Upper and Lower Canada?

It was created in 1791 by the division of the old Province of Quebec into Lower Canada in the east and Upper Canada in the west. Upper Canada was a wilderness society settled largely by Loyalists and land-hungry farmers moving north from the United States.



Upper Canada.

Article by Roger Hall
Updated by Richard Foot


Why was Lower Canada called Lower Canada?





The prefix “lower” in its name refers to its geographic position farther downriver from the headwaters of the St. Lawrence River than its contemporary Upper Canada, present-day southern Ontario. Lower Canada was abolished in 1841 when it and adjacent Upper Canada were united into the Province of Canada.

What was Upper and Lower Canada called?

In 1841, Upper Canada and Lower Canada were renamed Canada West and Canada East, respectively. They were united as the single colony of the Province of Canada. Lower Canada was a British colony from 1791 to 1840. Its geographical boundaries comprised the southern portion of present-day Quebec.

What was in Upper Canada?

Upper Canada included all of modern-day Southern Ontario and all those areas of Northern Ontario in the Pays d’en Haut which had formed part of New France, essentially the watersheds of the Ottawa River or Lakes Huron and Superior, excluding any lands within the watershed of Hudson Bay.

What did Lower Canada want?

Their leaders sought to take power from the Catholic Church in areas such as education. They also wanted to check the power of the anglophone merchant class. It was expanding its economic base due to the rapid growth in the timber trade. (See also: Francophone-Anglophone Relations.)

Why was Lower Canada Above Upper Canada?





The Canada Act of 1791 divided the colony of Quebec into two parts along the Ottawa River. The names “upper” and “lower” come from their position along the St. Lawrence River. Upper Canada was up river, closer to the source and Lower Canada was down river, closer to the mouth of the great waterway.

Why did Upper and Lower Canada rebel?

Rebellion in Upper Canada (and Lower Canada also) broke out after the 1836 Legislative Assembly elections were corrupted. It seemed then that the reformers’ struggles could only be settled outside the framework of existing colonial institutions.

What is Upper Canada known as today?

Canada West, also called Upper Canada, in Canadian history, the region in Canada now known as Ontario. From 1791 to 1841 the region was known as Upper Canada and from 1841 to 1867 as Canada West, though the two names continued to be employed interchangeably.

Why did Upper and Lower Canada join?

In 1841, Britain united the colonies of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This was in response to the violent rebellions of 1837–38. The Durham Report (1839) recommended the guidelines to create the new colony with the Act of Union.

Why was Lower Canada created?

Upper and Lower Canada were formed by the Constitutional Act of 1791 in response to the wave of United Empire Loyalists moving north from the United States into the French-speaking province of Quebec following the American Revolution (1765-1783).



What religion were most in Lower Canada?

Christianity is the largest religion in Canada, with Roman Catholics having the most adherents. Christians, representing 63.2% of the population in 2019, are followed by people having no religion with 26.3% of the total population.

How were the Upper and Lower Canada rebellions both different and like one another?

The revolt in Lower Canada was more serious and violent than the rebellion in Upper Canada. However, both events inspired the pivotal Durham Report. It led to the Act of Union, which merged the two colonies into the Province of Canada. It also resulted in the introduction of responsible government.

Who was the leader of Lower Canada?

Louis-Joseph Papineau

The Rebellion in Lower Canada was led by Louis-Joseph Papineau and his Patriotes, as well as more moderate French Canadian nationalists, who together dominated the elected Legislative Assembly.

What did the reformers want in Upper Canada?

They wanted to limit the power of the ruling elite by introducing responsible government. Radical reformers, on the other hand, wanted the colony to adopt republican principles. Men such as Charles Duncombe and John Arthur Roebuck wanted to create a social and economic democracy like the one in the United States.



What was the main reason for the rebellions in Upper and Lower Canada in the 1830s?

The Rebellions of 1837–1838 (French: Les rébellions de 1837), were two armed uprisings that took place in Lower and Upper Canada in 1837 and 1838. Both rebellions were motivated by frustrations with lack of political reform.

Why did Britain create Upper Canada and Lower Canada?

After taking control of all Canada after the French and Indian War in 1763, ethnic and religious tensions grew between Catholic French and Protestant English colonists. In response, the British government divided Canada into an Upper, mainly English area, and Lower, mainly French area, in 1791.

Why did Upper and Lower Canada join?

In 1841, Britain united the colonies of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This was in response to the violent rebellions of 1837–38. The Durham Report (1839) recommended the guidelines to create the new colony with the Act of Union.

In what year were Upper and Lower Canada united?

1840

In 1840 the Act of Union united Upper and Lower Canada into one Province of Canada.



Why was Lower Canada created?

Upper and Lower Canada were formed by the Constitutional Act of 1791 in response to the wave of United Empire Loyalists moving north from the United States into the French-speaking province of Quebec following the American Revolution (1765-1783).

What is Upper Canada known as today?

Canada West, also called Upper Canada, in Canadian history, the region in Canada now known as Ontario. From 1791 to 1841 the region was known as Upper Canada and from 1841 to 1867 as Canada West, though the two names continued to be employed interchangeably.